August surprises…

Rudbeckia Henrik Eilers, Tostat, August 2019

August can be a cruel month. It can be the bald spot in the summer when the garden flags under the impact of heat and little rain- and if you are gardening summer-dry, as I do, with no watering except for the plants in pots, it can feel relentless. But, it is also the point in the year when midway though the month, some of the nights and early mornings begin to smell and feel different, fresher, cooler and morning dew is heavier. This can act as a real tonic to the garden, encouraging fresh growth and hot-weather plants to flower, and I love it too. Going out first thing with the all-important cup of tea becomes a pleasure again, as plants revive and try some more.

This year, Rudbeckia ‘Henrik Eilers’ has moved itself back into the border almost half a metre. Maybe it too is avoiding the sun and seeking some cover from other plants. I love the quilled petals and the straight bolt-upright growth, but deeper into the border, I am standing on a chair to capture the special shape of it, as, standing at nearly 2 metres, I am a shortarse by comparison. By contrast, Buphthalmum salicifolium has been toppled to the ground almost by the very occasional heavy rain we have had in the last 6 weeks- but it flowers away regardless on the deck.

Buphthalmum salicifolium, Tostat, August 2019

A few yards away, my recovering Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’ has won it’s battle with the adorable thug that is Clerondendrum bungei, and is well clear of it in the height stakes. I love the darkness of the purple against the best feature of the Clerodendrum, in my view, which is the jewel-like remnants of the spent flowerheads. Spectacular.

Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’ and Clerodendrum bungei, Tostat, August 2019

Smaller plants are also carrying on despite the heat, though looking a little jaded maybe. My absolute favourite Crocosmia is Crocosmia x crocosmiifolia ‘Emily McKenzie’, not as tall as ‘Lucifer’, and a lot more inclined to flop, at least for me, but the striking orange and carmine flowers bring a touch of Rita Hayworth to the garden, even if they are mostly horizontal to the ground.

Crocosmia ‘Emily McKenzie’, Tostat, August 2019

I have two Leycesteria in the garden, great shrubs in my opinion, especially because the form and the flowers keep going all summer long, looking fabulous right through to the end of autumn. The species plant, Leycesteria formosa, has strong, arching branches that make a great domed-shape in the border and has the classic dropping swags of flowers, fading to dark-red berries in the autumn. The variety, ‘Golden Lanterns’, is even better, with greeny-golden foliage contrasting well with the glossy, dark purple/red flowers which fade to bright jewel-like berries.

Leycesteria formosa, Tostat, August 2019
Leycesteria formosa ‘Golden Lanterns’, Tostat, August 2019

Now here is a puzzle. In this odd picture, you can see the smaller pot on the chair, with a narrow-leaved plant and an orange inflorescence. Next to it, is a tall, diamond-shaped leaved plant with a bud on the top. The taller plant is, or at least I thought it was Leonotis leonorus– actually I am still pretty that it is leonorus. In the pot, is a plant that I stuck in there having no idea of what it was until yesterday when the flowerspike opened up. It seems to be a smaller, more shrub-like Leonitis, maybe nepetifolia, but it has quite different leaves, slim and lanceolate, and is woody as opposed to being a green stem. Am definitely confused…anyone out there have another idea???

The two Leonitus’ side by side, Tostat, August 2019
Leonitis nepetifolia perhaps, Tostat, August 2019

Salvia ‘Ton Ter Linden’ has been a grand plant, although new to me this year. Deep blackberry-purple narrow flowers have kept coming…and the tendency to gracefully drape around the pot has been followed by upright, strong growth, so the plant has two ways of behaving- how clever of it.

Salvia Ton Ter Linden, Tostat, August 2019
Scrophularia macrantha, Tostat, August 2019

I have grown Scrophularia macrantha from seed this year. Small, but beautifully formed and I was so thrilled that I could be heard shrieking in the garden when I found the flowers on my tiny plants. I hope they make it through the winter.

Gossypium hirsutum flower bud, Tostat, August 2019

And my cotton has flowered! Unlikely that I will be harvesting cotton balls, but the Gossypium hirsutum flowers are a beautiful, if short-lived, surprise. Actually, the whole plant is a rather fine, if temporary addition to the garden, wine-red leaves and upright growth, pretty buds as if cut from paper. It won’t survive the winter and I probably won’t try to overwinter it, but just grow it again from seed next spring perhaps.

Cytoglossum hirsutum bud formation, Tostat, August 2019

Aha and…oh no…

Valeriana pyrenaica, Greenbank Garden, Glasgow, May 2019

Sometimes a plant just catches your eye. This plant did. Wandering around Glasgow’s Greenbank Garden, it was growing in massive clumps in the woodland area, as well as being used as a filler plant in the borders. I asked a young gardener if she could identify it, but she couldn’t. But, sometimes, luck plays a part in finally cracking an identity.

Leafing through the plant lists for the RHS Hampton Court Garden Festival gardens, there it was in the ‘Calm amidst chaos’ garden, designed by Joe Francis. Valeriana pyreniaca is actually a native of the French Pyrenees- fancy going all the way to Glasgow to see it! It is a sturdy grower, making a good clump just a metre and a bit tall, with heart-shaped leaves which remind me of Clerodendrum bungei, and like the Clerodendron, it prefers a moistish soil and not totally blazing sun all day. The wide semi-umbel shaped flowers in pale pink actually seem to sparkle in the sun, as fine plant parts reach out to frame the flatter part of the flowerhead. Very pretty and great for insects of all shapes and sizes. I am going to try some from seed.

Rosa ‘Astrid, Grafin von Hardenberg’, Tostat, September 2017

I am coming to the conclusion that my garden is getting too summer-dry for repeat flowering roses. The old varieties that flower once early in the season are doing fine, as by now, the show is well over and they are happily sliding into summer dormancy. But the later and repeat flowering roses are really suffering, and today, I dug up and potted up a third one, Rosa ‘Astrid, Grafin von Hardenberg’, a lovely rose reduced to a couple of twigs and a few leaves needing serious tlc in a pot. She joins Rosa ‘Summer Song’ and Rosa ‘Jacqueline du Pre’ which were both potted up this Spring. Astrid will bounce back, but I do think that this is another sign of the drying and warming that has changed our summers. I am not abandoning my non-watering policy, but if I want to grow these roses, I need to turn to the pot. And resist the temptation to grow any more than those I already have. That discipline could be tricky….