Gardening delights in the Languedoc

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Chateau de Beaufort from the vineyards, Herault, June 2016

A great weekend with old friends in the Languedoc coincided with the annual French gardens open weekend, and so I had the chance to visit La Petite Pepiniere in Caunes Minervois, which has been run by the inspiring Gill Pound for the past 18 years.  Gill Pound is now retiring from running the nursery, whilst still maintaining her garden design work and running occasional gardening courses, but the nursery will be continued and expanded by Imogen Checketts and Kate Dumbleton from a new site right  next to the original La Petite Pepiniere.

There were some lovely things to see, and to buy.  I really loved the shingle beachside feel of this gravel planting of grasses.

New to me was this fabulous tree, Melia azderach.  Wide, sweeping, tiered foliage with swags of violet blossoms, and the stunning matte brown bare trunk makes this tree a superb specimen for a hot, dry position, which really catches the eye.  Throwing good shade I think during summer, it would make an ideal small garden or courtyard tree.  It’s an Australian native tree, tough, drought tolerant and even handling some frost apparently.  According to Top Tropicals, it is a fast grower, reaching 15-16m in a few years with a wide canopy as you can see.   The blossom is quite gorgeous, and apparently has a strong fragrance, but, as ever, the Piasecka nose was not in operation.

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Melia azderach, La Petite Pepiniere, Caunes Minervois, June 2016

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Melia azderach blossom, La Petite Pepiniere, Caunes Minervois, June 2016

The garden had some beautiful flower moments too.  I really loved this jumble of flowering plants together, all mature specimens, and so making a shower of bloom and colour.

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Cistus purpurea, Origanum ‘Kent Beauty’ and Phlomis fruticosa, La Petite Pepiniere, Caunes Minervois, June 2016

I think I have identified these correctly, but what works so well is the grey, pink colouring of the Origanum which just bridges the deeper pink of the Cistus and the banana yellow of the Phlomis.

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Halimium halimifolium, La Petite Pepiniere, Caunes Minervois, June 2016

This lemon  Halimium is so bright, it almost blinds in sunlight.  It is a stunning performer, and I would adopt Christopher Llloyd’s refusal to worry about colours together in this case.  Upright, yet also tumbling in habit, drought tolerant, it bounces back from wind, rain , hail, and pretty much everything, whilst also repeat flowering, and being frost hardy.  Not bad.

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Unknown Callistemon flower, La Petite Pepiniere, Caunes Minervois, June 2016

As we left, this unknown Callistemon was doing a great firework impression.  Of course, there were purchases made.  When you get the chance to visit a really thoughtful collection of plants, it’s impossible to leave empty-handed.  And one of my purchases flowered today, it’s first flower, I think.  Who wouldn’t want this orange-shred delight?

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Abutilon pictum, Tostat, June 2016

 

 

4 thoughts on “Gardening delights in the Languedoc

  1. I can confirm how quickly Melia grows. just over 9 years ago I planted a seedling from a friends garden,, it was about 40 cm high and about as thick as my ring finger; it is now larger than the one you showed. It contains a natural insecticide so it is a great shade tree as there are rarely any insects near it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a treat. Not so many years ago I wouldn’t even have used yellow in the garden. Combined with pink.. sacre bleu! And yet now I have it too and love the effect. How times change and thank goodness for it.

    Like

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